Mackinac Island

The rooster tail from our ferry and Mackinac Bridge, the largest suspension bridge in the US.

The rooster tail from our ferry and Mackinac Bridge, the largest suspension bridge in the US.

We’ve heard about Mackinac Island for years and now finally we can check it off our bucket list.   For those of you not familiar with the island, there are no vehicles allowed.  After taking a 20 minute ferry ride over Lake Huron to the island you are faced with a decision –  walk, rent a bike or take a horse drawn carriage to explore the island.  It was a gorgeous cool day and we chose a tandem bike to ride around the 8 mile parameter of the island.

Missionary Bark Chapel replica from 1670

The replica of a Jesuit birchbark chapel that was built on Mackinac Island in 1670

Saite Anne Church

Sainte Anne Church

Baptismal records dating back to 1670 are located in the church

Baptismal records dating back to 1695 are located in the church

The worlds largest summer hotel

The worlds largest summer hotel

Stately carriage used to pick up guests of  Grand Hotel

The stately carriages used to pick up guests of the Grand Hotel

Arrival of their luggage via separate carriage

Arrival of guest luggage is done via a separate carriage

The entrance to the hotel

The entrance to the hotel

Just one side of the world longest wooden porch

One side of the world longest wooden porch

The Grand Dining room where we had lunch

The Main Dining room where we had lunch

IMG_4188

Grand statistics of the Grand Hotel

The island has a long history dating back to the 1670’s when it was originally settled by fur traders.    During the Revolutionary War in  1780 a large fort was built, which still stands today.  This same fort was  was captured by the British during the war of 1812.

The island became very popular during Victorian times and the main streets are full of beautifully restored homes and hotels, of which the most spectacular is the Grand Hotel, built in 1887.

After finishing our bike ride around the island we returned it and began strolling along some of the back streets, up to the fort and eventually over to the Grand Hotel.   We had worked up a great hunger and rewarded ourselves with the buffet lunch at the hotel.

There is an admission charge of $10 to go in the hotel or even onto the porch but if you buy lunch you are refunded your admission fee.   Instead of spending money on the famous fudge or a t-shirt, we had lunch at the Grand Hotel.

The town is full of Victorian homes turned into B & B's and great hotels

The town is full of Victorian homes turned into B & B’s and great hotels

We highly recommend it.

6 responses to “Mackinac Island

  1. We rented bikes on our honeymoon 49 years ago and biked around the island. We returned in 2008 and stayed at a B&B. Your post brought back great memories. I think we opted for the fudge! Next time we’ll do the Grand Hotel. Looks great!

    • sunandsandtravelers

      Wow, how awesome! It would be a great place for a honeymoon and I’m sure it must have been incredible 49 years ago before all the fudge and t-shirt shops became prevalent. We definitely want to go back and spend the night some time.

      • Are you in the UP? if you get to Munising, check out the Dogpatch! Its a fun local place. Our first son was born in Munising while Gary was training at the Kimberly Clark paper mill. It was an exciting year. They have a great park with some unique rock formations on Lake Suoerior, the name I can’t remember. You can see them by boat or hike in the park. Have fun!

      • sunandsandtravelers

        Yes, we’re here now and went to Pictured Rocks yesterday. Thanks for the tip on the Dogpatch, we saw it on our way in. We’re going to try and pass through Door County and are looking for tips on places to see and good restaurants.

  2. Looks like another wonderful find, and wonderful weather (although acceptable here, I envy you). So… what was for lunch?

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